Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and accurate technique that allows the detection of chromosome aberrations. In this method, a single-stranded fluorescent-labeled nucleic acid sequence (probe) complementary to a target genomic sequence is hybridized to detect the presence or absence of a given abnormality. FISH is a method of choice for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment response in hematopoietic neoplasms (leukemia, lymphomas, multiple myeloma, and myelodysplasia) and solid tumors (breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and cervical cancer).Testing of oncology specimens, whether the sample is blood, bone marrow, fresh tissue,
or paraffin block, is available.
  • Medical Director, Cytogenetics and Genomic Microarray
    Dr. Andersen is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her PhD in genetics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and completed a clinical cytogenetics fellowship at the University of Utah. She is board certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics and is a fellow of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Dr. Andersen’s interests include both constitutional and oncology cytogenetics. She is an active member of the Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen) group’s efforts to improve constitutional structural variant interpretation, and her oncology research projects include improving the diagnosis and monitoring for myelodysplastic syndromes and understanding the genetic etiology of rare histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms.
  • Co-Division Chief, Anatomic and Molecular Oncologic Pathology
    Medical Director, Biocomputing
    Dr. Bronner is a Carl R. Kjeldsberg presidential endowed professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Bronner received her MD from the University of Pennsylvania and completed her pathology residency training and chief residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Dr. Bronner’s honors include her election as president of the GI Pathology Society, election as council member of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, and, in 2005, the award of the Arthur Purdy Stout Prize, recognizing her work as a surgical pathologist under the age of 45 whose research publications have had a major impact on diagnostic pathology. Dr. Bronner is an editorial journal board member for Human Pathology and Modern Pathology. She has served as an investigator on numerous NIH and foundation grants over the course of her career and has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and numerous book chapters.
  • Medical Director, Cytology
    Dr. Chadwick is an associate professor of anatomic pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD at Loma Linda University in California where she also served as a pathology fellow. Dr. Chadwick completed her residency in anatomic and clinical pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine and was a cytopathology fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is a member of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, American Society of Cytopathology, and College of American Pathologists. Dr. Chadwick’s research interests include the use of molecular markers in cytopathology, pancreatic and biliary cancer, and cervical cancer screening.
  • Medical Director, Cytogenetics
    Dr. Cox is board certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics and is a diplomate in both clinical cytogenetics and clinical molecular genetics. Dr. Cox received master’s degrees in human genetics and administrative science from Johns Hopkins University and a doctorate in human genetics from the University of Maryland at Baltimore. She completed a clinical cytogenetics and clinical molecular genetics fellowship at the University of Maryland, Division of Human Genetics.
  • Medical Director, Cytology
    Dr. Gopez is a professor of pathology and associate dean in the Office of Inclusion and Outreach at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD at the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, Philippines, and completed her residency in anatomic and clinical pathology at the Berkshire Medical Center in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. She also completed a fellowship in cytopathology and surgical pathology at the University of Pennsylvania and is board certified in cytopathology, as well as anatomic and clinical pathology. For seven years, Dr. Gopez served as residency program director at the University of Utah Department of Pathology. She assists ARUP’s clients by signing out specimen cases while also teaching residents and fellows in training.
  • Medical Director, Cytogenetics and Genomic Microarray
    Dr. Hong is an assistant professor of pathology at University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD at Beijing Medical University in Beijing, China, and completed a residency in internal medicine and hematology at People’s Hospital, Beijing Medical University, and a clinical cytogenetics fellowship at the University of Utah. Her academic interests include the clinical significance of cytogenetic findings in hematologic malignancies, particularly in pediatric leukemia and treatment-related leukemia.
  • Medical Director, Molecular Hematopathology
    Medical Director, Hematopathology
    Dr. Kelley is an associate professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Utah. He received his MS in immunology and microbiology and his MD from Ohio State University, and completed his residency in anatomic and clinical pathology and fellowship training in hematopathology at the Cleveland Clinic. He is board certified in anatomic and clinical pathology by the American Board of Pathology, with subspecialty certification in hematology. His research interests include the identification of novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in leukemia and lymphoma.
  • Section Chief, Cytogenetics and Genomic Microarray
    Dr. Lamb is a professor of clinical pathology in the Department of Pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. He received his PhD from Wesleyan University in molecular biology and biochemistry. He completed fellowships in clinical cytogenetics in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of North Carolina and in clinical molecular genetics at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Lamb is a founding fellow of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and is certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics in clinical cytogenetics. His primary areas of interest are in prenatal and postnatal chromosome diagnosis and the characterization of the phenotypic features (neurodevelopmental and physical development) associated with copy number changes.
  • Medical Director, Hematopathology
    Dr. Miles is an associate professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. He received his MD and a PhD in cell biology from the University of Nebraska and is certified by the American Board of Pathology in anatomic and clinical pathology, with subspecialty certification in hematology. His research interests include biological subtypes of adult and pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Dr. Miles is a member the American Society of Hematology, the Society for Hematopathology, and the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology.
  • Medical Director and Section Chief, Hematopathology
    Co-Chief, Clinical Pathology
    Vice Chair, Pathology
    Senior Vice President, Research and Development
    Executive Director, ARUP Institute for Clinical & Experimental Pathology®
    Dr. Perkins, a tenured professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine, has been with ARUP and the University of Utah for more than 20 years and has served in numerous leadership positions, including director of hematopathology, interim department chair, and, for the past three years, a member of ARUP Laboratories’ executive management team. She is board certified in anatomic pathology, with a special qualification in hematology. Dr. Perkins received her PhD in biochemistry from the University of Miami, and earned her MD and completed her pathology residency at Washington University in St. Louis. She completed her hematopathology fellowship under Dr. Carl Kjeldsberg at the University of Utah and has published more than 170 peer-reviewed articles and 70 book chapters.
  • Medical Director, Cytogenetics
    Dr. Quigley received her PhD in molecular and medical genetics at Oregon Health Sciences University and completed post-doctoral fellowships in clinical cytogenetics and clinical molecular genetics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is board certified in clinical cytogenetics and clinical molecular genetics by the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Dr. Quigley is a member of the CAP Cytogenetics Resource Committee and president of the American Cytogenetics Conference. Her research interests include integrated cytogenetic and molecular genetic testing algorithms in hematological disease for accurate diagnosis, prognosis, and guided therapy.
  • Chief, Hematopathology
    Dr. Salama is professor of pathology, chief of hematopathology, and director of the Hematopathology Fellowship Program at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Salama received his MD from Cairo University and completed a hematopathology fellowship at the University of New Mexico and a surgical pathology fellowship at Stanford University. He is certified by the American Board of Pathology in anatomic pathology and hematopathology. His areas of interest span all aspects of hematopathology, including morphology, specialized studies of bone marrow and lymph node, and digital pathology.
  • Medical Director, Cytogenetics & Genomic Microarray
    Dr. Schultz received a master of science in biology at Wayne State University in Detroit and a PhD in genetics at Michigan State University. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University School of Medicine and a cytogenetics fellowship with subsequent American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics board certification at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. Dr. Schultz is a member of several professional societies, including the American Society of Human Genetics and Association of Molecular Pathology. His research interests include chromosomal basis of human disease and development, DNA repair and cancer, and chromosome and genome stability in cancer.
  • Medical Director, Cytogenetics and Genomics
    Dr. Toydemir is an assistant professor at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. He was a fellow in cytogenetics at ARUP Laboratories and a previous postdoctoral associate in the Human Genetics Department at the University of Utah. He completed his PhD in genetics at the University of Utah and his MD at the University of Ankara, School of Medicine in Turkey. Dr. Toydemir was the recipient of the 2007 James W. Prahl Award for Outstanding Contributions by a Graduate Student in the biological or biomedical science at the University of Utah, and is a member of the American Society of Human Genetics and Turkish Society of Medical Genetics.
  • Senior Consultant, Hematopathology
    Dr. Weiss is a professor of pathology at the University of Utah. He received his MD from Creighton University and an MBA from the University of Utah, where he completed his residency training. Currently a senior hematopathology consultant, Dr. Weiss served as ARUP’s chief medical officer and director of laboratories, executive vice president, director of business development, and president and COO. He is past chairman of the board of the American Clinical Laboratory Association and past president of the American Pathology Foundation, as well as a fellow of the College of American Pathologists and American Society for Clinical Pathology.
  • Medical Director, Cytopathology
    Dr. Witt is an assistant professor of anatomic pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine, where he serves as the residency rotation director for cytopathology. Dr. Witt received his MD at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine and completed his AP/CP pathology residency at the University of Chicago (NorthShore) where he served as the chief resident during his last two years. He also completed a cytopathology fellowship at the University of Utah/ARUP Laboratories, and is board certified in anatomic and clinical pathology, with subspecialty boards in cytopathology. Dr. Witt is a member of the College of American Pathologists Cytopathology Committee, the American Society for Clinical Pathology, and the American Society of Cytopathologists. His research interests include studies related to fine-needle aspiration and head and neck pathology.