Regional Events

The ARUP Institute for Learning is committed to supporting educational events that advance the practice of laboratory medicine and improve quality patient care by providing guest speakers at local and regional meetings. Listed below are the current events where the Institute for Learning is providing sponsored speakers.

JAN
22
Details ASCLS-CO Winter Seminar
Grand Junction, CO

Justin R. Rhees, MS, MLS(ASCP)CMSBBCM

Interprofessional Education: Applications for Medical Laboratory Science

In the interprofessional education (IPE) exercise shown in this presentation, medical laboratory science students, nursing students, and acute care nurse practitioner students demonstrated practical skills, applied knowledge learned throughout their respective programs of study, and worked together in an interprofessional healthcare team to manage a simulated medical crisis. This presentation will describe the objectives and outcomes of this IPE exercise, including the simulation, learning outcomes, and pre- and post-assessments. Challenges including planning, scheduling, and cost will be discussed, and other applications for IPE will be explored.

Advanced Antibody Identification: Case Studies

In this presentation a brief refresher on antibody identification procedures will be given, followed by several antibody identification case studies in increasing levels of difficulty. Participants will be given a packet to work through and opportunities to discuss results.


Karen A. Brown, MS, MLS (ASCP)CM

Clinical Coordinator, Medical Laboratory Sciences, Department of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine Professor of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine
Hematology M+Ms: Morphology and Mystery (Case Studies)

Hematology instrumentation has advanced to now routinely include at least a five-part differential and, in some laboratories, automated cell image analysis. Yet, a manual examination of the blood smear is still an essential procedure that provides valuable diagnostic information. This session will use case studies to define important morphologic variations and physiologic processes in selected disease conditions.

  • Morphologically differentiate abnormal variations in RBCs, WBCs, and platelets.
  • Explain underlying physiological processes for abnormal RBC, WBC, and platelet morphology.
  • Describe the morphologic basis for distinguishing benign from malignant WBC disorders.
  • Correlate abnormal cellular morphologic variations with selected case studies

Casey Leavitt, MBA and Kyle Dean Hueth, MLS(ASCP) CM

Top techniques for increasing the impact of your utilization management program


Lucinda Manning, BA, MT(ASCP), RN

Assistant Vice President, Blood Services and Immunohematology Reference Laboratory (IRL), ARUP Laboratories
Reporting Laboratory Errors Without Fear

Employees being able to report laboratory errors without fear is a key component of an effective error management system. This presentation will focus on the necessity for making the system useful and easy to use. Case studies are used to discuss a variety of errors and to illustrate how identification of errors can lead to practical solutions in error prevention. A just culture vs. punitive culture will be addressed along with ideas for getting employee “buy-in”. Additionally, strategies for mentoring and coaching employees with high error rates will be provided.

When Professions Meet—Bridging the Gap between Laboratory and Nursing

Ms. Manning will give a comparison of the differences in learning in the laboratory and nursing professions. She will share personal examples of the struggles each profession has in understanding each other. She will also discuss practical ways to bridge the gaps in understanding between the two professions. Ms. Manning encourages the audience to be interactive and to share problems as well as best practices and successes in bridging the gap between these two professions.


Lucinda Manning, BA, MT(ASCP), RN

Assistant Vice President, Blood Services and Immunohematology Reference Laboratory (IRL), ARUP Laboratories
Reporting Laboratory Errors Without Fear

Employees being able to report laboratory errors without fear is a key component of an effective error management system. This presentation will focus on the necessity for making the system useful and easy to use. Case studies are used to discuss a variety of errors and to illustrate how identification of errors can lead to practical solutions in error prevention. A just culture vs. punitive culture will be addressed along with ideas for getting employee “buy-in”. Additionally, strategies for mentoring and coaching employees with high error rates will be provided.

When Professions Meet—Bridging the Gap between Laboratory and Nursing

Ms. Manning will give a comparison of the differences in learning in the laboratory and nursing professions. She will share personal examples of the struggles each profession has in understanding each other. She will also discuss practical ways to bridge the gaps in understanding between the two professions. Ms. Manning encourages the audience to be interactive and to share problems as well as best practices and successes in bridging the gap between these two professions.

MAR
19
Details CAMLT's 2016 Spring Seminar South
North Hollywood, CA

Rhonda Hensley, MS, SM(ASCP)CMC

AVP Group Manager, Classic Infectious Disease, ARUP Laboratories
T&C’s of C&T’s: Terms and Conditions of Competency and Training

Documentation of training and competency continues to take a larger role in the laboratory. This interactive session will briefly review current regulatory requirements, share ideas on designing checklists, discuss different approaches to competency assessment, and teach how to design well-written questions to reduce test-wise employee’s guessing the right answers.

Assays: To Make or Buy?

This session offers a brief overview of using test cost and breakeven analysis to compare cost effectiveness of different methodologies or determining whether to bring an assay in-house.

APR
1
Details ASCLS - MI
East Lansing, MI

David Grenache, PhD

Medical Director, Special Chemistry, ARUP Laboratories, Associate Professor of Pathology, University of Utah
Clinical Chemistry of Pregnancy

Normal pregnancy is associated with a multitude of physiological adaptations. Although most pregnancies progress without complications, problems can problems can arise in the mother, fetus, or placenta. This presentation describes normal pregnancy-related physiological changes and several disorders that are associated with pregnancy that can affect laboratory test results.


Archana Agarwal, MD

Medical Director, Hematopathology and Special Genetics
Lab Diagnosis of Hemolytic Anemias

Hemolysis is characterized by destruction or removal of red blood cells from the circulation before their normal life span of 120 days. It can be a lifelong asymptomatic condition, however, it most often manifests as anemia. There is a long list of causes of hemolytic anemia including both hereditary and acquired causes. While a variety of laboratory tests are available to evaluate the different causes of hemolytic anemia, the list can be confusing.


David Grenache, PhD

Medical Director, Special Chemistry, ARUP Laboratories, Associate Professor of Pathology, University of Utah
Identifying the Pregnant Patient: There's More to Know than 'Yes' or 'No'

Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is used as a biomarker to determine a woman’s pregnancy status. The detection of hCG is commonly done by the use of qualitative hCG tests using urine or serum. While both sample types can be used, urine is often preferred due to its ability to be analyzed at the point-of-care. Urine hCG testing is plagued by several limitations yet these are often not appreciated by clinical care providers and laboratorians. This presentation will describe the limitations of qualitative urine and serum hCG tests and explain the causes of erroneous results. It will also describe the effect that qualitative hCG tests have on turnaround time and patient length of stay.


Joely Straseski, PhD, MS, MT(ASCP), D(ABCC)

Medical Director, Endocrinology, Co-Medical Director, Core Laboratory
Utility of Mass Spectrometry in Endocrinology: Reports from the Front Line

While not routinely employed by the typical laboratory, mass spectrometry (MS) offers many advantages for measuring endocrine analytes. MS has made a positive impact on the ability to diagnose complicated endocrine disorders due to benefits including increased sensitivity and improved specificity. This session will outline and discuss these benefits of MS.


Brian R. Jackson, MD, MS

Vice President, Chief Medical Informatics Officer, ARUP Laboratories
Improving Utilization of Laboratory Tests


Tiffany Bradshaw, MLS (ASCP)CM

Technical Supervisor, Microbial Immunology I, ARUP Laboratories
Part I: The Culturally Diverse Workplace. How to Integrate, Mentor, and Retain your Employees

Part II: Is There A Bully in the Room? What Laboratory Managers Should Know about Workplace Bullying


Elizabeth L. Frank, PhD

Medical Director, Analytic Biochemistry Laboratory
Medical Director, Calculi and Manual Chemistry Laboratory
Co-Medical Director, Mass Spectrometry Laboratory
Part I: Porphyrins and Porphyrias

The porphyrias are a group of rare diseases associated with defects in the biosynthetic pathways of heme. Heme biosynthesis and the porphyrias will be discussed in this session. Porphyrins are intermediates in the heme iosynthetic pathway that may be produced in excess, accumulated in body tissues, and excreted in body fluids. Characteristics of porphyrins and other pathway intermediates present in the body fluids of patients with disease will be described. Laboratory tests and methods used to detect porphyrins and precursor compounds for diagnosis of porphyria will be reviewed.

Part II: Diagnosing Porphyria

The acute and non-acute porphyrias - including signs and symptoms of the diseases, enzyme deficiencies, inheritance patterns, prevalence, and precipitating factors will be described. The properties of porphyrins and other intermediates of heme biosynthesis will be discussed. These features contribute to toxicity and produce characteristic symptoms of diseases, and allow for their detection in body fluids. An algorithm for laboratory testing used for evaluation of suspected porphyria will be presented. Participants will assess typical laboratory test results in the context of characteristic patient presentation to differentiate the individual porphyrias.


Frederick G. Strathmann, PhD, DABCC (CC, TC)

Medical Director, Toxicology
Director, High-Complexity Platforms—Mass Spectrometry
Assistant Director, ARUP Institute of Clinical & Experimental Pathology®
One of These Tests is Not Like the Other: Comparative effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and utilization guidance in pain management testing

Many technologies are used for testing in toxicology, each with strengths and weaknesses. Harnessing these technologies requires consideration of the needs from all involved. This presentation will use the area of pain management to illustrate workflow and assay designs to enhance effectiveness and utilization in this challenging area of toxicology.


Ken Curtis, BS, PBT (ASCP)

Hiring, Training, Retraining Entry Level Lab Personnel

Many positions such as phlebotomists, technicians, and processors are the first to turnover in the laboratory. This session will cover best practices in hiring quality personnel, training them to succeed, and strategies for retaining them. This session will include case studies of successes in reducing turnover and improve quality in entry level lab personnel.


Cherie V. Petersen, BA

Distance Education Program Coordinator
Leading with Authority Rather than Power

The words “management” and “leadership,” as well as “manager” and “leader,” are often used interchangeably. When a person is placed in a management position, he or she becomes the assumed leader. However, becoming a manager does not mean one is a leader. While power is an inherent component of any management position, the authority necessary to lead is often lacking. The power that comes with a position or title, and the authority earned through behaviors and actions are dramatically different approaches to leadership. A manager is given the power to manage a department, project, and/ or task, but authority can never be given. It can only be earned through personal influence. Understanding the subtle nuances between leading with authority versus leading by power can greatly increase your effectiveness as a manager and unlock your employees’ true potential. Understanding the concept of leading with authority and putting it into practice could mean the difference between having employees who come to work and provide only the bare minimum versus having high performance employees who are willing to engage their excitement, passion, and curiosity. Attendees of this course will walk away with a new perspective regarding their role as leaders and will look upon their responsibilities with a greater sense of significance, while recognizing their personal and professional impact on the employees they lead.


Cherie V. Petersen, BA

Distance Education Program Coordinator
Management Strategies for Creating a Culture of Service Excellence

Service excellence has become a critical success factor in healthcare. Even though the majority of laboratory services are not executed patient side, it hasn’t meant that laboratories are immune from service excellence initiatives Understanding how laboratories can thrive in the service excellence paradigm will be the focus of this session.


James McVey

Director – Institute for Learning and Human Services Information Systems ARUP Laboratories
Skills to Work With & Motivate the Next Generation

Generation WHY? The Millennial generation, also known as Generation Y, is defined by work-life balance, multi-tasking, and an integration of technology in all parts of life. Millennial employees are motivated by relationships, and thus benefit from being managed differently than other generations.

This presentation will focus on Millennial employees’ strengths, motives and values. What drives Millennial employees and how can employers tap into their strengths? How can employers effectively communicate with and manage Millennial employees while guiding Millennials’ to do their very best?


Suzanne Carasso, MBA, MT(ASCP)

Director, Business Solutions Consulting, ARUP Laboratories
The Value of the Laboratory: Invest or Outsource?

The impact of national healthcare reform is putting pressure on the healthcare industry to navigate reductions in reimbursement, implement cost-cutting initiatives, improve patient outcomes and quality of life. Changing the way healthcare is delivered and paid for is the new imperative.

Laboratories, now more than ever before, have a unique opportunity to substantially impact both short and long term sustainability of healthcare organizations. However, labs that continue to just produce lab test results will be viewed as a commodity and will likely be outsourced or sold. Some organizations are selling laboratory and outreach operations to private equity firms, joint venture capitalists or national laboratories in exchange for an immediate and significant infusion of cash. It follows that laboratories failing to demonstrate value to the organization face an uncertain future. This presentation will discuss industry trends that are influencing these decisions, the risks laboratories face and what labs can do to demonstrate value in tangible ways.

APR
29
Details 2016 Spring Meeting
La Vista, NE

Rodney R. Miles, MD, PhD

Medical Director, Hematopathology

MAY
2
Details Kaiser CE Event
Berkeley, CA

Sherrie Perkins, MD, PhD

Medical Director, Hematopathology Section Chief, Hematopathology Chief, Clinical Pathology Vice Chair, Pathology Senior Vice President, Research and Development Executive Director, ARUP Institute for Clinical & Experimental Pathology®
Hematopathology and Personalized Medicine

MAY
3
Details Kaiser CE Event
Santa Clara, CA

Sherrie Perkins, MD, PhD

Medical Director, Hematopathology Section Chief, Hematopathology Chief, Clinical Pathology Vice Chair, Pathology Senior Vice President, Research and Development Executive Director, ARUP Institute for Clinical & Experimental Pathology®
Hematopathology and Personalized Medicine


Frederick G. Strathmann, PhD, DABCC (CC, TC)

Medical Director, Toxicology Director, High-Complexity Platforms—Mass Spectrometry Assistant Director, ARUP Institute of Clinical & Experimental Pathology®
One of These Tests is Not like the Other: Comparative Effectiveness, Cost-effectiveness and Utilization Guidance in Pain Management Testing

This presentation will focus on test utilization in the area of pain management testing. Clinical toxicology is one of the fastest growing areas of laboratory medicine driven in large part by the needs in pain management. As a result, a wide variety of old and new workflows have been implemented in an attempt to address the needs of the patient, the physician, and the laboratory. Unfortunately, the complexity in test offerings, changing reimbursement strategies, and the inherent competition in the marketplace have made test selection overly complex for the majority of providers. Why and how specific analytical methods are used will be discussed and a deconvolution of several key concepts in toxicology will be provided. In addition, important cost considerations from the laboratory and provider point of view will be highlighted.


Frederick G. Strathmann, PhD, DABCC (CC, TC)

Medical Director, Toxicology Director, High-Complexity Platforms—Mass Spectrometry Assistant Director, ARUP Institute of Clinical & Experimental Pathology®
The Illusion of Quality: A Discussion of Roadblocks to Laboratory Quality and Case Studies of How to Make Things Better

Knowing which quality metrics to use when assessing your lab’s performance is just as important as knowing how to use them. The intent of this presentation is to discuss how to use data collected from quality metrics to assess and improve laboratory performance to meet your institution’s quality goals. Metrics used to assess current quality control impact, current state assessments of quality procedures, and unbiased outcome assessments useful in determining effectiveness of implemented changes will be discussed. Case studies using laboratory examples will form the basis for illustrating quality assessments and improving laboratory quality.


Lucinda Manning, BA, MT(ASCP), RN

Assistant Vice President, ARUP Blood Services
Reporting Laboratory Errors without Fear

Employees being able to report laboratory errors without fear, is a key component of an effective error management system. This presentation will focus on the necessity for making the system useful and easy to use. Case studies are used to discuss a variety of errors and to illustrate how identification of errors can lead to practical solutions in error prevention. A just culture vs. punitive culture will be addressed along with ideas for getting employee “buy-in”. Additionally, strategies for mentoring and coaching employees with high error rates will be provided.


Lucinda Manning, BA, MT(ASCP), RN

Assistant Vice President, ARUP Blood Services
When Professionals Meet: Bridging the Gap Between the Lab and Nursing

Ms. Manning will give a comparison of the differences in learning in the laboratory and nursing professions. She will share personal examples of the struggles each profession has in understanding each other. She will also discuss practical ways to bridge the gaps in understanding between the two professions. There will be time during the presentation to discuss the issues you may be facing within your own organizations in regards to the laboratory/nursing interactions and ways to enhance those relationships. Ms. Manning encourages the audience to be interactive and to share problems as well as best practices and successes in bridging the gap between these two professions.