Regional Events

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The ARUP Institute for Learning is committed to supporting educational events that advance the practice of laboratory medicine and improve quality patient care by providing guest speakers at local and regional meetings. Listed below are the current events where the Institute for Learning is providing sponsored speakers.

SEP
30
Details 2014 Indiana – CLMA & ASCLS - Indiana Collaborative Symposium
Carmel, IN

Casey Leavitt, MBA

Implementing a Test Utilization Management Program: Combining Medicine and Management

This presentation will focus on the most efficient methodologies to implement an effective laboratory utilization management program. It will follow a roadmap that includes analytics, governance/infrastructure, formulary, policy, implementation and maintenance.


Marc Roger Couturier, PhD(ABMM)

Helicobacter pylori: Update on Disease, Diagnosis, and Discouraging Trends

Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common infections found in humans. An estimated 50% of the world is infected, with significant illnesses associated with a significant proportion of these chronic infections. The diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori can be achieved through multiple mechanisms including invasive and non-invasive testing modalities. Clinically appropriate testing and evolving testing methodologies will be discussed in detail. Guidelines for testing various populations exist, however adherence and awareness of these guidelines remains a significant challenge. Once the difficult task of diagnosis is established, the treatment of these infections is no less a challenge, with increasing resistance to antimicrobial agents occurring at alarming rates. Challenges regarding treatment options and subsequent failures will be discussed.

Shigatoxigenic E. coli: A Fully Emerged, Still Underappreciated Pathogen

Shigatoxigenic E. coli (STEC) is an enteric pathogen associated with several foodborne infections throughout the world every year. The major virulence determinant that defines STEC is the shiga-like toxin which is capable of transmission between various gram-negative organisms. STEC causes significant morbidity during acute outbreaks, and can cause mortality associated with the development of hemolytic uremic syndrome. Until recently, testing for STEC in the clinical laboratory was inadequate, relying solely on selective, serogroup-biased culture methods. Recent advancements have been made which allow for toxin detection or molecular detection of toxin genes from stool specimens, removing the culture bias problem. With these improvements in screening, the cases of STEC reported have increased significantly; revealing a pathogen that may have eluded the laboratory for decades. The 2011 STEC outbreak in Germany will be discussed in detail as an example of the emerging nature of this enigmatic pathogen.

SEP
19
Details West Virginia Joint Conference of State Societies
Charleston, WV

Cherie V. Petersen

Communicating When There’s Potential for Conflict

Have you ever wanted to discuss an issue with someone at work but avoided the conversation because you didn’t want to cause or engage in conflict? Maybe you’ve brought up an issue that seemed insignificant, only to have it cause unintended conflict? In these situations there are a variety of possible outcomes, many of which could end badly. This course outlines a three-part strategy that illustrates how to handle situations where the potential for conflict exists. Participants will have the opportunity to apply the strategy and learn for themselves how to facilitate more satisfying outcomes when dealing with the potential for conflict.


Tiffany Bradshaw, MLS (ASCP)CM

Workplace Bullies in the laboratory

Workplace bullying is quickly becoming an epidemic with an estimated 54 million workers reporting being bullied. Bullying also occurs in health care organizations as there is a long history of tolerance and indifference. Bullies can be physicians, nurses, therapists, or technicians. Generally, bullies flourish because of manager’s inability to recognize the situation and take action with an estimated 62% of reported cases are made worse or simply ignored by management. Surprisingly, 72% of bullies are bosses. Additionally, one should not expect help from coworkers as 46 % of colleagues abandon the coworker while an additional 15 % joined with the bully.

Although new legislation and healthcare standards address workplace bulling, without manager training, support and awareness this epidemic will continue to spread.

Workplace Diversity

The culturally diverse workplace presents numerous challenges to managers and can present situations that can impact the integration, development and retention of employees. This session will assist the participant in developing strategies to better understand certain cultural differences. Ultimately, the speaker will explore how to communicate with members of diverse groups by learning to adapt their style to the receiver and understand the common barriers that interfere with their ability to effectively communicate. These tools can also be utilized to compare and contrast cultural value systems in order to be able to explore cultural differences in order to be effective at adapting management styles in a diverse workplace.

JUN
6
Details 2014 Region II Meeting
Lutherville-Timonium, MD

Marzia Pasquali, PhD, FACMG

Newborn Screening 50 years later

Newborn screening started 50 years ago with the development of the filter paper as a sample collection method and of a bacterial inhibition assay for screening for phenylketonuria. 50 years later, newborn screening has changed dramatically and has been one of the most successful genetic programs. This lecture will highlight the most significant accomplishments of newborn screening and the methodologies that have made this possible.


Karen A. Brown, MS, MLS(ASCP)

Phlebotomy Ps and Qs: Problems and Quandaries in Specimen Collection

Phlebotomists routinely encounter dangerous conditions, problem patients, and other issues during blood collection. This session will suggest techniques that can help you avoid or safely manage these difficulties. Areas to be discussed encompass:

  • Risks associated with venous blood collection, such as improper vein selection and needlestick exposure -unusual patient situations that impact phlebotomy practice, including the cancer and bariatric patient.
  • Communication barriers and methods to improve patient interactions, like developing good listening skills and effective communication approaches with the elderly.
  • Legal issues and the standard of patient care, to include types of liability and how to minimize risk. Designed for phlebotomists and phlebotomy students who have comprehension of the basics of the venipuncture technique, this session will enhance your skills, build your knowledge base, and help you deliver the highest quality in patient care.

MAY
16
Details CLMA-Sierra Nevada
Truckee, CA

Suzanne Carasso

The Value of the Laboratory: Invest or Outsource?

The anemic economic recovery, in combination with the impact of national healthcare reform, is putting pressure on the healthcare industry to navigate reductions in reimbursement, implement cost-cutting initiatives and improve patient outcomes and quality of life. Changing the way healthcare is delivered and paid for is the new imperative.

Laboratories, now more than ever before, have a unique opportunity to substantially impact both short and long term sustainability of hospitals and health systems. However, the old paradigm still exists in many organizations where the lab is viewed as a commodity. As such, some systems are selling laboratory and outreach operations to private equity firms, joint venture capitalists or national laboratories in exchange for an immediate and significant infusion of cash. It follows that laboratories failing to demonstrate value to the organization face an uncertain future.

This presentation will inform attendees of the industry trends that are influencing these decisions, the risks laboratories face and what labs can do to demonstrate value in tangible ways.


Karen Nielsen, MBA, MT (ASCP) SBB

Medical Event Reporting and Error Management

It is estimated that between 44,000 and 98,000 deaths occur annually in the U.S. due to medical mistakes. This presentation will use a case study approach to examine how systems and processes in the blood bank and laboratory can affect patient outcomes. This presentation focuses on helping participants identify “near misses” and examine process changes that could reduce or eliminate the opportunity for error.

Resolution of Positive DATs

Patients presenting with autoantibodies are among the most challenging pretransfusion workups encountered in the blood bank. This presentation will discuss common causes of a positive DAT and, using a case study approach, will identify laboratory approaches to resolving testing problems. Common laboratory procedures will be described, as well as newer molecular techniques that may aid in providing appropriate red cells for transfusion.


Jackie Lohdefinck

Leadership Across Generations: Understanding How to Leverage the Differences

This session will explore the differences and similarities of the five generations in today’s workforce. You’ll better understand how life experiences shape each generation’s characteristics, skills and values and gain insights about how these attributes both challenge and enhance the work environment. Ideas for more meaningful communication across generations, and development of employee engagement and retention strategies will be shared.


Anne E. Tebo, PhD

New Guidelines for the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease and the Challenges ofDiagnostic Algorithms

The presenter will discuss celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals of all ages and is triggered by immune response to gluten and related proteins. She will provide an overview of the immunopathogenesis, classification, clinical features, epidemiology and guidelines for laboratory evaluation of CD. In addition, the presenter will discuss the challenges regarding the use of specific CD serologic assays and how laboratories may help mitigate these problems. References related to this presentation are identified on specific slides and can be found in the hand-out.


Karen Nielsen, MBA, MT (ASCP) SBB

Medical Event Reporting and Error Management

It is estimated that between 44,000 and 98,000 deaths occur annually in the U.S. due to medical mistakes. This presentation will use a case study approach to examine how systems and processes in the blood bank and laboratory can affect patient outcomes. This presentation focuses on helping participants identify “near misses” and examine process changes that could reduce or eliminate the opportunity for error.

Resolution of Positive DATs

Patients presenting with autoantibodies are among the most challenging pretransfusion workups encountered in the blood bank. This presentation will discuss common causes of a positive DAT and, using a case study approach, will identify laboratory approaches to resolving testing problems. Common laboratory procedures will be described, as well as newer molecular techniques that may aid in providing appropriate red cells for transfusion.


Mohamed E. Salama, MD

Acute Myeloid Leukemia From Lab Perspective

We will outline stages of development of blood cells, and identify the consequences of failure of maturation in the setting of acute leukemia and various tests performed in different clinical laboratory involved in the diagnostic process. We also will address the relevance of the laboratory testing to the therapeutic and management decision making.


David P. Jackson, MBA

The Affordable Care Act: How Healthcare Reform Will Affect Laboratory Medicine

In this session Mr. Jackson will discuss the Affordable Care Act (ACA). He will explain the ACA’s origin, implementation, and future. Finally, the impact of the ACA on laboratory medicine and the health care environment will be considered.

Key Features of Effective Management

Mr. Jackson will lead a discussion on key management and planning principles and how those principles can be used effectively in the laboratory.


Casey Leavitt, MBA

Implementing a Test Utilization Management Program: Combining Medicine and Management

This presentation will examine test utilization from both a medical and managerial perspective, focusing on information that guides utilization management efforts, such as inappropriate test ordering, and how tiering can be used to guide interventions. Also discussed will be various interventions used to control utilization, including their advantages and disadvantages, as well as managerial approaches to the implementation of a successful utilization program. Finally, case studies illustrating how effective utilization management can reduce costs and improve the quality of care will be presented.

APR
30
Details CLMA/ASCLS-MN
Brooklyn Park, MN

Kimberly E. Hanson, MD, MHS

Current Advances in TB Testing

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. In 2008, there were an estimated 9 million incident cases of TB worldwide with approximately 2 million TB-related deaths. Diagnostic delays have devastating consequences for the individual and the public health, such that improved case-detection through the development of new and improved diagnostic tests is a global priority. This session reviews current and emerging technologies for TB detection, with a focus on the advantages and limitations of each method.


Robert Schlaberg, MD, MPH

Update on Laboratory Diagnosis of Sexually Transmitted Diseases

This session will provide an overview of recent in STD incidents and diagnostic test applications, describe the problem of multi-drug resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae and implications for clinical laboratories, and review evidence for the utility of testing extragenital sites for N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis.


David G. Grenache, PhD

Clinical Chemistry and the Pregnant Patient
Screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Challenges and Controversies

Ken Curtis, BS, PBT (ASCP)

Avoiding Specimen Collection Errors

This presentation focuses on identifying common specimen collection issues and strategies for preventing these errors. We will discuss common errors in patient identification, phlebotomy techniques, and specimen labeling. We will also discuss identifying collection issues via pre-analytical processes, training for accuracy in collection, and monitoring improvement.


Chérie V. Petersen

Communication Biohazard

The laboratory plays an invaluable and enormously significant role in patient care. Given the laboratory’s valuable, what’s the one thing that could destroy it in a heartbeat? Communication issues! Laboratorians have all of this great, specialized expertise; however, sometimes the delivery sabotages the value. This session engages participants in a highly energetic, narrowly focused, interactive, humorous approach that allows them the opportunity to distinguish some of the bio-hazardous communications they engage in and then address more effective strategies to communicate their information, knowledge, and expertise.


Kamisha Johnson-Davis, PhD, DABCC

Drug Abuse Testing in the Clinical Laboratory
Overview of Toxicology

Joe Miles, MT(ASCP), MHS

Implementing a Diagnostic Utilization Management Program

As healthcare moves away from payment for volumes of services to systems of paying for performance and quality outcomes, hospitals and healthcare systems are focusing on becoming value-based organizations. All entities within healthcare are under tremendous pressure to reduce waste and assist physicians to become more efficient and achieve the best patient outcomes sooner with less variation from accepted practice norms and guidelines while controlling and reducing the total cost of care. Establishing an early and accurate diagnosis is the first step in reaching these overarching goals. This means using diagnostic tests and tools effectively, performing the right diagnostic test on the right patient at the right time and in the right sequence and at the right economics. Progressive organizations are preparing for the shift to greater risk sharing reimbursement arrangements by developing diagnostic utilization management programs. These programs include the development of test formulary and the institutional policies that support the implementation of the formulary as well as the governance structure required to manage the program.


Belinda Baron

Bullying in the Workplace

Lucinda Manning, BA, MT(ASCP), RN

When Professionals Meet: Bridging the Gap Between the Laboratory and Nursing

Ms. Manning will give a comparison of the differences in learning in the laboratory and nursing professions. She will share personal examples of the struggles each profession has in understanding each other. She will also discuss practical ways to bridge the gaps in understanding between the two professions. There will be time during the presentation to discuss the issues you may be facing within your own organizations in regards to the laboratory/nursing interactions and ways to enhance those relationships. Ms. Manning encourages the audience to be interactive and to share problems as well as best practices and successes in bridging the gap between these two professions.


Robert Schmidt MD, PhD, MBA
Casey Leavitt, MBA

Implementing a Test Utilization Management Program: Combining Medicine and Management

This presentation will examine test utilization from both a medical and managerial perspective, focusing on information that guides utilization management efforts, such as inappropriate test ordering, and how tiering can be used to guide interventions. Also discussed will be various interventions used to control utilization, including their advantages and disadvantages, as well as managerial approaches to the implementation of a successful utilization program. Finally, case studies illustrating how effective utilization management can reduce costs and improve the quality of care will be presented.


Sarah South, PhD

Advances in Copy Number Detection by FISH and Microarray

Karen A. Brown, MS, MLS (ASCP)CM

Hematology M & M’s: Morphology and Mystery

Hematology instrumentation has advanced to now routinely include a five-part differential and, in some laboratories, automated cell image analysis. Yet, a manual examination of the blood smear is still an essential procedure that provides valuable diagnostic information. This session will use case studies to define important morphologic variation and physiologic processes in selected disease conditions.


Joe Miles, MT(ASCP), MHS

Creating Value in the New Age of Diagnostics

Joe Miles, MT(ASCP), MHS

Creating Value in the New Age of Diagnostics
JAN
24
Details ASCLS-CO Winter Education Seminar
Grand Junction, CO

David R. Hillyard, MD

Emerging Infectious Diseases
Molecular Diagnosis of Viral Respiratory Infections