Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and accurate technique that allows the detection of chromosome aberrations. In this method, a single-stranded fluorescent-labeled nucleic acid sequence (probe) complementary to a target genomic sequence is hybridized to detect the presence or absence of a given abnormality. FISH is a method of choice for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment response in hematopoietic neoplasms (leukemia, lymphomas, multiple myeloma, and myelodysplasia) and solid tumors (breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and cervical cancer).Testing of oncology specimens, whether the sample is blood, bone marrow, fresh tissue,
or paraffin block, is available.
  • Co-Division Chief, Anatomic and Molecular Oncologic Pathology
    Medical Director, Biocomputing
    Dr. Bronner is a Carl R. Kjeldsberg presidential endowed professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Bronner received her MD from the University of Pennsylvania and completed her pathology residency training and chief residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Dr. Bronner’s honors include her election as president of the GI Pathology Society, election as council member of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, and, in 2005, the award of the Arthur Purdy Stout Prize, recognizing her work as a surgical pathologist under the age of 45 whose research publications have had a major impact on diagnostic pathology. Dr. Bronner is an editorial journal board member for Human Pathology and Modern Pathology. She has served as an investigator on numerous NIH and foundation grants over the course of her career and has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and numerous book chapters.
  • Medical Director, Cytology
    Dr. Chadwick is an associate professor of anatomic pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD at Loma Linda University in California where she also served as a pathology fellow. Dr. Chadwick completed her residency in anatomic and clinical pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine and was a cytopathology fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is a member of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, American Society of Cytopathology, and College of American Pathologists. Dr. Chadwick’s research interests include the use of molecular markers in cytopathology, pancreatic and biliary cancer, and cervical cancer screening.
  • Medical Director, Neuropathology
    Dr. Palmer is a professor of pathology and the director of the Pathology Residency Program at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her MD at West Virginia University and served as a resident in neurology and postdoctoral fellow in neuropathology at the University of Utah, where she also completed internships in internal medicine and pathology. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology, serves as the vice-president elect of the American Association of Neuropathologists, and sits on the editorial board of Case Reports in Pathology. Dr. Palmer’s research interests include neuropathological parameters of epilepsy, relationships between histologic and molecular genetic findings in brain tumors, and pediatric neuropathology, with special emphasis on epileptogenic disorders and brain tumors.
  • Medical Director, Cytopathology
    Dr. Witt is an assistant professor of anatomic pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine, where he serves as the residency rotation director for cytopathology. Dr. Witt received his MD at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine and completed his AP/CP pathology residency at the University of Chicago (NorthShore) where he served as the chief resident during his last two years. He also completed a cytopathology fellowship at the University of Utah/ARUP Laboratories, and is board certified in anatomic and clinical pathology, with subspecialty boards in cytopathology. Dr. Witt is a member of the College of American Pathologists Cytopathology Committee, the American Society for Clinical Pathology, and the American Society of Cytopathologists. His research interests include studies related to fine-needle aspiration and head and neck pathology.